Author: Laudy Issa

Laudy Issa is a multimedia journalist and the Managing Editor of Beirut Today. You might catch her tripping over wires in local theatres or gigs.

Protests in Beirut, with demonstrators demanding their rights while it rains (Eva Mahfouz)
Lebanon Protests: Leaderless and decentralized, but superbly well-organized

“Even if it rains fire, we’re staying until we get what we want.”

President Aoun’s speech wasn’t even live

The rumours aren’t true. President Aoun is alive.

Hariri to Protesters: Lebanese Cabinet agreed on reforms and 2020 state budget

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri announced that the Lebanese Cabinet has agreed to all points.

Security forces and sectarian “thugs” crack down on protesters in Lebanon

Today marks the third day of the Lebanese protests. Yesterday night, a festive atmosphere took.

Thousands of Anti-Government Protesters Take To The Streets In Lebanon

From Saida to Beirut to Tripoli, spontaneous protests have broken out in Lebanon. Here’s a.

Fires in the Chouf area (Albawaba)
Fires spread across Lebanon, local firefighting planes need $450,000 maintenance

More than 104 fires have spread across Lebanon since early Monday morning, according to the.

Still from Interbellum's Ready To Dissolve music video, directed by Camille Cabbabé.
Interbellum takes you down a winding, nostalgic road with Dead Pets, Old Griefs

Interbellum’s Karl Mattar would much rather let his music speak for itself than sit for.

Beirut Pride suspends opening night until further notice

Statements from both the queer community in Lebanon and religious authorities called for its boycott, but for vastly different reasons.

Garbage crisis: Around 85 percent of Lebanon's waste goes to open dumps or landfills, even though 88 to 90 percent of it can be composted or recycled. (Infographic by Christina Atik)
Lebanese Politicians Will Never Agree On A Sustainable Solution To The Garbage Crisis

Harsh criticism or reality?

Panel discussion at the first Refugees=Partners conference. (Refugees=Partners)
Refugees=Partners: Better refugee policies can benefit both Syrians and Lebanese host communities

That’s not all: Syrian refugees are actually filling some of the gaps in the Lebanese economy, as opposed to competing with the Lebanese workforce.