Author: Lynn Sheikh Moussa

Online activism, activism leaves the streets / illustration by Joseph Abi Saab
Protests halt, but activism persists despite pandemic

Protestors have had to forgo their streets, but have substituted this for art, illustration, writing, Instagram lives and many more.

Visual showing some of the repurcussions of the Bisri Dam project. (Photo: Environmental Justice Atlas)
Bisri Dam project to resume, says cabinet during lockdown

Activists say the Bisri Dam will lead to an “environmental genocide” and fear further mismanagement of Lebanon’s water resources.

A dog wears a mask over its mouth on a street in Beijing on February 13, 2020. Pets article on Animals Lebanon
COVID-19: Pets ditched on Beirut streets, animal welfare groups swamped

On misinformation and the economic hardships of both pet owners and animal welfare groups in Lebanon.

Lebanese soldiers standing guard in the Beirut's downtown district on March 15.(Arab News via AFP) Medical emergency article
Social distancing is a luxury many cannot afford in Lebanon

Without government support, this state of medical emergency may prove hellish for many.

Roumieh prison sterilized following riots and fear of coronavirus spread

Assessments by lawyers show that the conditions of the prison are “cramped and unsanitary,” which means coronavirus is more likely to spread among inmates.

Lebanese doctor requests MPs and ministers donate salaries to combat coronavirus

Leading Dr. Nidal Mawla in Lebanon’s coronavirus response is requesting MPs and ministers to donate.

“Down with the rule of the bank” reads this graffiti on the door of Bankmed, one of the top five banks in Lebanon. A default deals a major blow to the banking system in Lebanon. (AP / Financial Times)
Lebanon’s default: What it means, what’s next, and who’s to blame

By defaulting, the new Lebanese government is openly declaring the country’s crisis to investors and countries worldwide.

Marijuana article: Syrian refugees work in cannabis field in Bekaa. (Patrick Baz / AFP / The Guardian)
Legalizing marijuana will not save the Lebanese economy

Who will benefit from legalizing marijuana? Similar to the tobacco industry, it most certainly is not the cannabis farmers.

Onlooker watching Kozo perform at the first Onomatopoeia "On Shuffle" concert. (Laudy Issa)
On Shuffle: Musicians faced with shrinking spaces in Lebanese economic crisis

“Any time one of these places suffer, we all suffer as a community and that’s why we all work together to keep them afloat and keep ourselves afloat.”

A giant "Stop Solidere" sign drapes over the St. Georges Hotel for all to see. (Allan Leonard)
St. Georges Hotel wins license to rebuild after decades of Solidere struggle

The Beirut municipality granted the owner of the famous St. Georges Hotel a license to renovate the damaged landmark after decades of dispute with Solidere.