Protesting the Bisri Dam (ejatlas.org)
The Bisri Dam Project in Lebanon is a “Ticking Atomic Bomb”

Despite the benefits that the CDR is promising from the Bisri Dam project, environmental activists are not convinced and for good reason.

Police on site where Daniel Ezzedine, a student of Lebanese decent, was attacked in Canterbury. (Kent Online)
A small UK community mobilized when teen of Lebanese descent was assaulted

“Here, people don’t want others to feel unsafe.”

Lebanese University student protests the government's austerity measures. (Facebook / تكتّل طلاّب الجامعة اللبنانية)
Here’s How (And Why) Sectarian Politics Suppressed the Lebanese University Strike

The LU strike saw independent movements finding a space of resistance & members of sectarian parties putting their needs ahead of party loyalty.

LebMASH's Executive Director Souad Al Challah (left) and "Break The Silence" winner Johnny Zakhour.
Do Lebanon’s Future Doctors Accept the LGBTQ+ Community? LebMASH BTS Winner Explores

Does the LGBTQ+ community in Lebanon trust healthcare providers? Do future doctors accept queer patients?

The work of Marlene Juliane, an illustrator based in Germany, often redefines femininity using nudity and body hair.
The Artists of Instagram on the Real Women of the World

It’s high time that hegemonic “feminine” standards are ousted by the realities of what it means to be a woman. Marlene Juliane’s art does that.

Jowan Safadi: The Trials and Tribulations of Being An Arab Artist

In Jowan Safadi, radical art meets radical politics. The Palestinian musician makes provocative and accessible political music that’s much lacking in the Arab world.

Lebanese University strike
Students at the Lebanese University haven’t had courses in three weeks

Professors at the Lebanese University are on strike, demanding their rights from the government but putting the futures of students at risk. Students react:

The entrance to Beit Beirut, where the exhibition accompanying the launch of the timeline of the women's movement in Lebanon is on display until Saturday evening. (Laudy Issa)
You can now see the entire history of the women’s movement in Lebanon

For over a hundred years, women have willingly put up with the ridicule, the belittling, and the pushback from the public to advocate for women’s rights in Lebanon. And they had previously been forgotten.

Illustration by Christina Atik showing three women holding megaphones. The first woman, with medium-length black hair and a crop top is saying "All the catastrophes are patriarchal." The second woman, with short hair and a loose white shirt continues "And feminism." The third woman, with a white hijab, adds "Is the solution."
On they march: Hundreds protest for women’s rights in Lebanon

Women in Lebanon are angry, and rightfully so. Nationality, criminal, personal status, and labour laws.

Waste incinerators are not the solution to the Lebanese trash crisis

The lack of a proper waste management framework and monitoring process leaves room for the illegitimate private gain of authorities in charge of costly waste incinerator projects.