Turkish powerships would provide a quick and less costly solution to the Lebanese electricity crisis. (Wisdom Events)
Buying electricity from Turkish ships would quickly solve Lebanon’s crisis

Purchasing electricity from Turkish ships would solve Lebanon’s crisis by quickly generating more energy, saving billions of dollars, and leading to significant economic growth.

Illustration by Christina Atik showing three women holding megaphones. The first woman, with medium-length black hair and a crop top is saying "All the catastrophes are patriarchal." The second woman, with short hair and a loose white shirt continues "And feminism." The third woman, with a white hijab, adds "Is the solution."
On they march: Hundreds protest for women’s rights in Lebanon

Women in Lebanon are angry, and rightfully so. Nationality, criminal, personal status, and labour laws.

The newly-formed Lebanese Cabinet pose with President Michel Aoun.
The new Lebanese Cabinet and the economic reforms we should worry about

Lebanon’s new Cabinet was recently formed, but does that mean enough reform to bring sensible economic policy and quality services?

Hands of a man counting a stack of 50,000 Lebanese liras in an exchange shop in Beirut
This isn’t Greece: On Lebanon’s fiscal deficit, debt cuts, and reform

The president of the Lebanese Economic Association discusses the fiscal deficit, why the Greek analogy is flawed, media claims of debt restructuring in Lebanon, and the need for reform.

Waste incinerators are not the solution to the Lebanese trash crisis

The lack of a proper waste management framework and monitoring process leaves room for the illegitimate private gain of authorities in charge of costly waste incinerator projects.

Is Lebanon’s Economy On The Brink Of Collapse?

The anxiety created around a Greek-style national bankruptcy has allowed the ruling politicians and their allies to steer (again) the public debate towards a “crisis management” rhetoric, away from a real discussion on accountability and responsibility for what got us into this.

Who is the “Civil Society” that is preparing to run for Parliamentary Elections?

The term “civil society” has been used to describe those who are “active” outside the traditional societal organizations and within oppositional movements against other parts of society, mainly against state authorities.

Lebanon’s Budget: Between Fraudulent Expenses and Nepotism

To get a better understand these issues, we ought to carefully examine the 2017 state budget endorsed by the parliament in October.

Iran’s Protests: Reclaiming the Revolution

To many nations, the 28th of December marked nothing  more than a year approaching its.

Drug laws in Lebanon work against small users, for big dealers

To be abducted from one’s home, taken to a strange underground place, and isolated from.